Quotation by Xenophanes

A tragedy, then, is the imitation of an action that is serious and also, as having magnitude, complete in itself; in language with pleasurable accessories, each kind brought in separately in the parts of the work; in a dramatic, not in a narrative form; with incidents arousing pity and fear, wherewith to accomplish its catharsis of such emotions.
If oxen and horses and lions had hands and were able to draw with their hands and do the same things as men, horses would draw the shapes of gods to look like horses and oxen to look like oxen, and each would make the gods' bodies have the same shape as they themselves had.
Xenophanes (b. c. 570 B.C.), Greek philosopher. Quoted in Clement [second century A.D.], Miscellanies 5.110, Readings in Ancient Greek Philosophy, trans. by R.D. McKirahan, Jr., eds., S. Marc Cohen, Patricia Curd, and C.D.C. Reeve, Hackett Publishing Co. (1995).
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