Quotation by Henry David Thoreau

Again it happens that the Boston Court-House is full of armed men, holding prisoner and trying a MAN, to find out if he is not really a SLAVE. Does anyone think that justice or God awaits Mr. Loring's decision? For him to sit there deciding still, when this question is already decided from eternity to eternity, and the unlettered slave himself and the multitude around have long since heard and assented to the decision, is simply to make himself ridiculous.... Such an arbiter's very existence is an impertinence. We do not ask him to make up his mind, but to make up his pack.
Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Slavery in Massachusetts" (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 389, Houghton Mifflin (1906).

Thoreau refers to the return of the fugitive slave, Anthony Burns, from Massachusetts to the South.
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