Quotation by Friedrich Nietzsche

All great things bring about their own destruction through an act of self-overcoming: thus the law of life will have it, the law of the necessity of "self-overcoming" in the nature of life—the lawgiver himself eventually receives the call: "patere legem, quam ipse tulisti." In this way Christianity as a dogma was destroyed by its own morality; in the same way Christianity as morality must now perish, too: we stand on the threshold of this event. After Christian truthfulness has drawn one inference after another, it must end by drawing its most striking inference, its inference against itself; this will happen, however, when it poses the question "what is the meaning of all will to truth?"
Friedrich Nietzsche (1844–1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 5, p. 410, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980); Basic Writings of Nietzsche, p. 597, trans. and ed. by Walter Kaufmann, New York, Modern Library (1968). On the Genealogy of Morals, "Third Essay," section 27 (1887).

The Latin phrase means "Submit to the law that you yourself proposed."
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