Quotation by Oscar Wilde

An entirely new factor has appeared in the social development of the country, and this factor is the Irish-American, and his influence. To mature its powers, to concentrate its action, to learn the secret of its own strength and of England's weakness, the Celtic intellect has had to cross the Atlantic. At home it had but learned the pathetic weakness of nationality; in a strange land it realised what indomitable forces nationality possesses. What captivity was to the Jews, exile has been to the Irish: America and American influence have educated them.
Oscar Wilde (1854–1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Pall Mall Gazette (London, April 13, 1889).

Excerpt from a review of J.A. Froude, The Two Chiefs of Dunboy: Or an Irish Romance of the Last Century.
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