Quotation by Henry David Thoreau

As for Waldo, he died as the mist rises from the brook, which the sun will soon dart his rays through. Do not the flowers die every autumn? He had not even taken root here. I was not startled to hear that he was dead; it seemed the most natural event that could happen. His fine organization demanded it, and nature gently yielded its request. It would have been strange if he had lived. Neither will nature manifest any sorrow at his death, but soon the note of the lark will be heard down in the meadow, and fresh dandelions will spring from the old stocks where he plucked them last summer.
Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, March 2, 1842, to Lucy Brown, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 42, Houghton Mifflin (1906).

Waldo was the son of Ralph Waldo Emerson.
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