Quotation by Ludwig Wittgenstein

Ask yourself whether our language is complete—whether it was so before the symbolism of chemistry and the notation of the infinitesimal calculus were incorporated in it; for these are, so to speak, suburbs of our language. (And how many houses or streets does it take before a town begins to be a town?) Our language can be seen as an ancient city: a maze of little streets and squares, of old and new houses, and of houses with additions from various periods; and this surrounded by a multitude of new boroughs with straight regular streets and uniform houses.
Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889–1951), Austrian-born British philosopher. Philosophical Investigations, pt. 1, no. 18, Macmillan (1953).
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