Quotation by Robert Benchley

But ice-crunching and loud gum-chewing, together with drumming on tables, and whistling the same tune seventy times in succession, because they indicate an indifference on the part of the perpetrator to the rest of the world in general, are not only registered on the delicate surfaces of the brain but eat little holes in it until it finally collapses or blows up.
Robert Benchley (1889–1945), U.S. writer, humorist. No Poems or Around the World Backwards and Sideways, "Little Noise Abatement," Harper & Brothers (1932).
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