Quotation by Louis Aragon

Can the knowledge deriving from reason even begin to compare with knowledge perceptible by sense? No doubt the number of people crass enough to reply exclusively on the former and scorn the latter are sufficient in themselves to explain the disfavor into which everything deriving from the senses has gradually fallen. But when the most scholarly of men have taught me that light is a vibration, or offered me any other fruits of their labors of reasoning, they will not have rendered me an account of what is important to me about light, of what my eyes have begun to teach me about it, of what makes me different from a blind man—things which are the stuff of miracles, not subject matter for reasoning.
Louis Aragon (1897–1982), French poet. "Preface to a Modern Mythology," Paris Peasant (first published 1926, repr. 1971).
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