Quotation by Shakespeare

Come, civil night,
Thou sober-suited matron all in black,
And learn me how to lose a winning match
Played for a pair of stainless maidenhoods.
Hood my unmanned blood, bating in my cheeks,
With thy black mantle till strange love grow bold,
Think true love acted simple modesty.
Come, night. Come, Romeo. Come, thou day in night;
For thou wilt lie upon the wings of night
Whiter than new snow upon a raven's back.
Come, gentle night, come, loving, black-browed night,
William Shakespeare (1564–1616), British poet. Romeo and Juliet (III, ii).

"Civil" means mannerly, observing propriety; Juliet is now married, and anxiously awaiting nightfall and the coming of Romeo. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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