Quotation by Miguel De Cervantes

Death eats up all things, both the young lamb and old sheep; and I have heard our parson say, death values a prince no more than a clown; all's fish that comes to his net; he throws at all, and sweeps stakes; he's no mower that takes a nap at noon- day, but drives on, fair weather or foul, and cuts down the green grass as well as the ripe corn: he's neither squeamish nor queesy-stomach'd, for he swallows without chewing, and crams down all things into his ungracious maw; and tho' you can see no belly he has, he has a confounded dropsy, and thirsts after men's lives, which he guggles down like mother's milk.
Miguel De Cervantes (1547–1616), Spanish writer. Sancho Panza, in Don Quixote, pt. 2, bk. 5, ch. 20, trans. by P. Motteux (1615).
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