Quotation by Walter Pater

Dionysus, as we see him in art and poetry, is the projected expression of the ways and dreams of this primitive people, brooded over and harmonised by the energetic Greek imagination; the religious imagination of the Greeks being, precisely, a unifying or identifying power, bringing together things naturally asunder, making, as it were, for the human body a soul of waters, for the human soul a body of flowers; welding into something like the identity of a human personality the whole range of man's experiences of a given object, or series of objects—all the hidden ordinances by which those facts and qualities hold of unseen forces, and have their roots in purely visionary places.
Walter Pater (1839–1894), British writer, educator. originally published in Fortnightly Review (Dec. 1876). "A Study of Dionysus," pp. 22-3, repr. In Greek Studies: A Series of Essays, Macmillan (1895).

Posthumously prepared for the press by Charles L. Shadwell.
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