Quotation by Aldous Huxley

Drill and uniforms impose an architecture on the crowd. An army's beautiful. But that's not all; it panders to lower instincts than the aesthetic. The spectacle of human beings reduced to automatism satisfies the lust for power. Looking at mechanized slaves, one fancies oneself a master.
Aldous Huxley (1894–1963), British novelist. Philip Quarles, in Point Counter Point, ch. 29 (1928).

This passage comes from the notebook of Philip Quarles, the principal character in the narrative. As a writer committed to the novel of ideas, Quarles is in large part Huxley's self- portrait. Here Quarles reflects on having witnessed the assembly of a militia founded by a British fascist, Everard Webley, modeled on Oswald Mosely.
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