Quotation by Richard Bentley

Every living language, like the perspiring bodies of living creatures, is in perpetual motion and alteration; some words go off, and become obsolete; others are taken in, and by degrees grow into common use; or the same word is inverted to a new sense or notion, which in tract of time makes an observable change in the air and features of a language, as age makes in the lines and mien of a face.
Richard Bentley (1662–1742), British classical scholar, critic. A Dissertation Upon the Epistles of Phalaris (1699).
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