Quotation by Dorothy L. Sayers

Fantasy works inwards upon its author, blurring the boundary between the visioned and the actual, and associating itself ever more closely with the Ego, so that the child who has fantasied himself a murderer ends by becoming a Loeb or a Leopold. The creative Imagination works outwards, steadily increasing the gap between the visioned and the actual, till this becomes the great gulf fixed between art and nature. Few writers of crime-stories become murderers—if any do, it is not the result of identifying themselves with their murderous heroes.
Dorothy L. Sayers (1893–1957), British theologian, mystery writer. The Mind of the Maker, ch. 9, Harcourt (1941).
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