Quotation by Henry David Thoreau

Far over the ice, between the hemlock woods and snow-clad hills, stands the pickerel-fisher.... He does not make the scenery less wild, more than the jays and the muskrats, but stands there as a part of it, as the natives are represented in the voyages of early navigators, at Nootka Sound, and on the Northwest coast, with their furs about them, before they were tempted to loquacity by a scrap of iron. He belongs to the natural family of man, and is planted deeper in nature and has more root than the inhabitants of towns.
Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "A Winter Walk" (1843), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 5, pp. 180-181, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
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