Quotation by Plato

For the poets tell us, don't they, that the melodies they bring us are gathered from rills that run with honey, out of glens and gardens of the Muses, and they bring them as bees do honey, flying like the bees? And what they say is true, for a poet is a light and winged thing, and holy, and never able to compose until he has become inspired, and is beside himself, and reason is no longer in him. So long as he has this in his possession, no man is able to make poetry or to chant in prophecy.
Plato (c. 428–348 B.C.), Greek philosopher. Ion 534a7-b6, Collected Dialogues of Plato, trans. by Lane Cooper, eds. Edith Hamilton and Huntington Cairns, Princeton University Press (1963).
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