Quotation by Shakespeare

From camp to camp, through the foul womb of night,
The hum of either army stilly sounds,
That the fixed sentinels almost receive
The secret whispers of each other's watch.
Fire answers fire, and through their play flames
Each battle sees the other's umbered face.
Steed threatens steed, in high and boastful neighs
Piercing the night's dull ear; and from the tents
The armorers accomplishing the knights,
With busy hammers closing rivets up,
Give dreadful note of preparation.
William Shakespeare (1564–1616), British poet. King Henry V (IV, Prologue).

"Stilly" means softly; the "foul womb" will give birth to battle at dawn. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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