Quotation by Mark Twain

He ketched a frog one day and took him home and said he cal'lated to educate him; and so he never done nothing for three months but set in his back yard and learn that frog to jump. And you bet he did learn him, too. He'd give him a little punch behind, and the next minute you'd see that frog whirling in the air like a doughnut—see him turn one summerset, or maybe a couple, if he got a good start, and come down flat-footed and all right, like a cat.... Smiley said all a frog wanted was education, and he could do most anything—and I believe him.
Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835–1910), U.S. author. Sketches New and Old, American Publishing Company (1875). Simon Wheeler, in "The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County," p. 592, Mark Twain: Collected Tales, Sketches, Speeches, & Essays, 1852-1890, Library of America (1992).
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