Quotation by Cyril Connolly

I shall christen this style the Mandarin, since it is beloved by literary pundits, by those who would make the written word as unlike as possible to the spoken one. It is the style of all those writers whose tendency is to make their language convey more than they mean or more than they feel, it is the style of most artists and all humbugs.
Cyril Connolly (1903–1974), British critic. Enemies of Promise, ch. 2 (1938).

Referring to a style of English prose popularized by authors such as Addison—"responsible for many of the evils from which English prose has since suffered. He made prose artful and whimsical, he made it sonorous when sonority was not needed, affected when it did not require affectation."
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