Quotation by Willa Cather

"In great misfortunes," he told himself, "people want to be alone. They have a right to be. And the misfortunes that occur within one are the greatest. Surely the saddest thing in the world is falling out of love—if once one has ever fallen in."
Falling out, for him, seemed to mean falling out of all domestic and social relations, out of his place in the human family, indeed.
Willa Cather (1873–1947), U.S. novelist. Godfrey St. Peter, in The Professor's House, book III, ch. IV (1925).

The professor articulates the profound sense of alienation that accompanies his mid-life depression as he contemplates his family's imminent return from Europe.
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