Quotation by Kenneth Keniston

In the early nineteenth century, the doctrine of self-sufficiency came to apply to families as well as individuals.... The family became a special protected place, the repository of tender, pure, and generous feelings (embodied by the mother) and a bulwark and bastion against the raw, competitive, aggressive, and selfish world of commerce (embodied by the father).... In performing this protective task, the good family was to be as self-sufficient as the good man.
Kenneth Keniston (20th century), U.S. professor, human development. All Our Children, ch. 1, The Carnegie Council on Children (1977).
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