Quotation by Edmund Burke

In the weakness of one kind of authority, and in the fluctuation of all, the officers of an army will remain for some time mutinous and full of faction, until some popular general, who understands the art of conciliating the soldiery, and who possesses the true spirit of command, shall draw the eyes of all men upon himself. Armies will obey him on his personal account. There is no other way of securing military obedience in this state of things.
Edmund Burke (1729–1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790).

Burke's words prefigure the rise of Napoleon in France.
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