Quotation by Jane Austen

It is indolence ... indolence and love of ease; a want of all laudable ambition, of taste for good company, or of inclination to take the trouble of being agreeable, which make men clergymen. A clergyman has nothing to do but be slovenly and selfish; read the newspaper, watch the weather, and quarrel with his wife. His curate does all the work and the business of his own life is to dine.
Jane Austen (1775–1817), British novelist. Mary Crawford, in Mansfield Park, ch. 11 (1814).

"It will, I believe, be everywhere found, that as the clergy are, or are not what they ought to be, so are the rest of the nation." (Edmund, in Mansfield Park, ch. 9).
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