Quotation by Coleman Dowell

Life is a series of diminishments. Each cessation of an activity either from choice or some other variety of infirmity is a death, a putting to final rest. Each loss, of friend or precious enemy, can be equated with the closing off of a room containing blocks of nerves ... and soon after the closing off the nerves atrophy and that part of oneself, in essence, drops away. The self is lightened, is held on earth by a gram less of mass and will.
Coleman Dowell (1925–1985), U.S. novelist, dramatist, lyricist. Mrs. October's journal entry in "Tasmania, Now," pt. 3, Mrs. October Was Here (1973).
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