Quotation by D.H. Lawrence

Literary criticism can be no more than a reasoned account of the feeling produced upon the critic by the book he is criticizing. Criticism can never be a science: it is, in the first place, much too personal, and in the second, it is concerned with values that science ignores. The touchstone is emotion, not reason. We judge a work of art by its effect on our sincere and vital emotion, and nothing else. All the critical twiddle-twaddle about style and form, all this pseudoscientific classifying and analysing of books in an imitation-botanical fashion, is mere impertinence and mostly dull jargon.
D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885–1930), British author. "John Galsworthy," pt. 4, Phoenix: The Posthumous Papers of D.H. Lawrence, ed. E. McDonald (1936).
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