Quotation by Shakespeare

My travel's history,
Wherein of antres vast and deserts idle,
Rough quarries, rocks, and hills whose heads touch heaven,
It was my hint to speak—such was my process—
And of the cannibals that each other eat,
The anthropophagi, and men whose heads
Do grow beneath their shoulders.
William Shakespeare (1564–1616), British dramatist, poet. Othello, in Othello, act 1, sc. 3, l. 139-42.

On his exotic past; "antres" means caves; "rough quarries" means rugged precipices; "anthropophagi," or cannibals, and headless men were reported by Pliny, and figured in travel books still in the 16th century.
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