Quotation by Ralph Waldo Emerson

Napoleon renounced, once for all, sentiments and affections, and would help himself with his hands and his head. With him is no miracle, and no magic. He is a worker in brass, in iron, in wood, in earth, in roads, in buildings, in money, and in troops, and a very consistent and wise master-workman. He is never weak and literary, but acts with the solidity and the precision of natural agents. He has not lost his native sense and sympathy with things. Men give way before such a man, as before natural events.
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Napoleon; or, the Man of the World," Representative Men (1850).
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