Quotation by Shakespeare

Never since the middle summer's spring
Met we on hill, in dale, forest, or mead,
By pavèd fountain or by rushy brook,
Or in the beachèd margent of the sea
To dance our ringlets to the whistling wind,
But with thy brawls thou hast disturbed our sport.
William Shakespeare (1564–1616), British dramatist, poet. Titania, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 2, sc. 1, l. 82-7.

The quarrel between Oberon and Titania has gone on since the beginning of summer; a "paved" fountain flows over stones; "margent" means margin, and "ringlets" are circular dances that mark the grass with fairy rings.
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