Quotation by Frances Trollope

New York ... appeared to us ... a lovely and a noble city.... I think New York one of the finest cities I ever saw, and as much superior to every other in the Union, (Philadelphia not excepted), as London to Liverpool, or Paris to Rouen. Its advantages of position are, perhaps, unequalled any where. Situated on an island, which I think it will one day cover, it rises, like Venice, from the sea, and like that fairest of cities in the days of her glory, receives into its lap tribute of all the riches of the earth.... I think it covers nearly as much ground as Paris, but is much less thickly peopled. The extreme point is fortified towards the sea by a battery, and forms an admirable point of defence; but in these piping days of peace, it is converted into a public promenade, and one more beautiful, I should suppose, no city could boast.
Frances Trollope (1780–1863), British author. Domestic Manners of the Americans, ch. 30 (1832).

Trollope had spent seven weeks in New York City.
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