Quotation by Ralph Waldo Emerson

One thing is plain for all men of common sense and common conscience, that here, here in America, is the home of man. After all the deductions which are to be made of for our pitiful politics, which stake every gravest national question on the silly die, whether James or whether Jonathan shall sit in the chair and hold the purse; after all the deduction is made for our frivolities and insanities, there still remains an organic simplicity and liberty, which, when it loses its balance, redresses itself presently, which offers opportunity to the human mind not known in any other region.
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Speech, February 7, 1844, the Mercantile Library Association, Boston, Massachusetts. "The Young American," Nature, Addresses, and Lectures (1849).

The reference to "common sense" can be taken as a reference to Thomas Paine's famous pamphlet, written in January 1776, which argued that the American colonies had outgrown the British and ought to break free. In a similar fashion, Emerson in this speech and elsewhere argues for a second, cultural American revolution where the East Coast ought to break free from English letters, literature and customs and light out for the Western territories toward a more spiritually authentic original America.
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