Quotation by John Austin

Our common stock of words embodies all the distinctions men have found worth drawing, and the connections they have found worth marking, in the lifetimes of many generations; these surely are likely to be more numerous, more sound, since they have stood up to the long test of the survival of the fittest, and more subtle, at least in all ordinary and reasonably practical matters, than any that you or I are likely to think up in our armchairs of an afternoon—the most favored alternative method.
John Austin (1911–1960), British philosopher of language. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society (1956). "A Plea for Excuses," p. 182, Philosophical Papers (1961).

Classical justification for "ordinary language" philosophy.
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