Quotation by Aristotle

Our discussion will be adequate; if it has as much clearness as the subject-matter admits of; for precision is not to be sought for alike in all discussions, and more than in all the products of the crafts. Now fine and just actions, which political science investigates, exhibit much variety and fluctuation, so that they may be thought to exist only by convention, and not by nature. And goods also exhibit a similar fluctuation.... We must be content, then, in speaking of such subjects and with such premises, to indicate the truth roughly and in outline.... In the same spirit, therefore, should each of our statements be received; for it is the mark of an educated man to look for precision in each class of things just so far as the nature of the subject admits: it is evidently equally foolish to accept probable reasoning from a mathematician and to demand from a rhetorician demonstrative proofs.
Aristotle (384–322 B.C.), Greek philosopher. Nichomachean Ethics I.3: 1094b13-27, Complete Works of Aristotle, trans. by W.D. Ross, ed. Jonathan Barnes, Princeton University Press (1984).
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