Quotation by Mark Twain

Pap always said it warn't no harm to borrow things, if you was meaning to pay them back, sometime; but the widow said it warn't anything but a soft name for stealing, and no decent body would do it. Jim said he reckoned the widow was partly right and pap was partly right; so the best way would be for us to pick out two or three things from the list and say we wouldn't borrow them any more—then he reckoned it wouldn't be no harm to borrow the others. So we talked it over all one night, drifting on down the river, trying to make up our minds whether to drop the watermelons, or the cantelopes, or the mushmelons, or what. But toward daylight, we got it all settled satisfactory, and concluded to drop crabapples and p'simmons.
Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835–1910), U.S. author. Huck, in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, ch. 12 (1885).
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