Quotation by Thomas Ernest Hulme

Put shortly, these are the two views, then. One, that man is intrinsically good, spoilt by circumstance; and the other that he is intrinsically limited, but disciplined by order and tradition to something fairly decent. To the one party man's nature is like a well, to the other like a bucket. The view which regards him like a well, a reservoir full of possibilities, I call the romantic; the one which regards him as a very finite and fixed creature, I call the classical.
Thomas Ernest Hulme (1883–1917), British critic, philosopher. "Romanticism and Classicism," Speculations: Essays on Humanism and the Philosophy of Art, Harcourt Brace (1924).
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