Quotation by Walter Pater

Quite different from them [abstractions of animal nature] in origin and intent, but confused with them in form, are those other companions of Dionysus, Pan and his children. Home-spun dream of simple people, and like them in the uneventful tenour of his existence, he has almost no story; he is but a presence; the spiritual form of Arcadia, and the ways of human life there; the reflexion, in sacred image or ideal, of its flocks, and orchards, and wild honey; the dangers of its hunters; its weariness in noonday heat; its children, agile as the goats they tend, who run, in their picturesque rags, across the solitary wanderer's path, to startle him, in the unfamiliar upper places; its one adornment and solace being the dance to the homely shepherd's pipe, cut by Pan first from the sedges of the brook Molpeia.
Walter Pater (1839–1894), British writer, educator. originally published in Fortnightly Review (Dec. 1876). "A Study of Dionysus," pp. 7-8, repr. In Greek Studies: A Series of Essays, Macmillan (1895).

Posthumously prepared for the press by Charles L. Shadwell.
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