Quotation by Chauncey Wright

Science asks no questions about the ontological pedigree or a priori character of a theory, but is content to judge it by its performance; and it is thus that a knowledge of nature, having all the certainty which the senses are competent to inspire, has been attained—a knowledge which maintains a strict neutrality toward all philosophical systems and concerns itself not with the genesis or a priori grounds of ideas.
Chauncey Wright (1830–1875), U.S. philosopher. Originally published in North American Review (1865). "The Philosophy of Herbert Spencer," repr. In Philosophical Writings of Chauncey Wright (1963), p. 8.
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