Quotation by Shakespeare

Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless sea,
But sad mortality o'ersways their power,
How with this rage shall beauty hold a plea,
Whose action is no stronger than a flower?
O how shall summer's honey breath hold out
Against the wrackful siege of batt'ring days,
When rocks impregnable are not so stout,
Nor gates of steel so strong but time decays?
O fearful meditation, where alack,
Shall Time's best jewel from Time's chest lie hid?
Or what strong hand can hold his swift foot back,
Or who his spoil of beauty can forbid?
William Shakespeare (1564–1616), British poet. Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless sea (l. 1–12). . .

The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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