Quotation by Ludwig Wittgenstein

Suppose everyone had a box with something in it: we call it a "beetle." No one can look into anyone else's box, and everyone says he knows what a beetle is only by looking at his beetle.—Here it would be quite possible for everyone to have something different in his box. One might even imagine such a thing constantly changing.—But suppose the word "beetle" had a use in these people's language?—If so it would not be used as the name of a thing. The thing in the box has no place in the language game at all; not even as a something: for the box might even be empty.—No one can 'divide through' by the thing in the box; it cancels out, whatever it is.
Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889–1951), British (Austrian born) philosopher. Philosophical Investigations, part I, 293 (1953).

Sensations like pains "drop out of consideration as irrelevant" to the function of language that is ostensibly about them.
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