Quotation by Ralph Waldo Emerson

The Imagination may be defined to be, the use which the Reason makes of the material world. Shakespeare possesses the power of subordinating nature for the purposes of expression, beyond all poets. His imperial muse tosses to creation like a bauble from hand to hand, and uses it to embody any caprice of thought that is upper-most in his mind. The remotest spaces of nature are visited, and the farthest sundered things are brought together, by a subtle spiritual connection. We are made aware that magnitude of material things is relative, and all objects shrink and expand to serve the passion of the poet.
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Nature, ch. 6 (1836, revised and repr. 1849).

Shakespeare, William (1564-1616).
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