Quotation by Ralph Waldo Emerson

The charming landscape which I saw this morning is indubitably made up of some twenty or thirty farms. Miller owns this field, Locke that, and Manning the woodland beyond. But none of them owns the landscape. There is property in the horizon which no man has but he whose eye can integrate all parts, that is, the poet. This is the best part of these men's farms, yet to this their warranty-deeds give no title.
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Nature, ch. 1 (1836, revised and repr. 1849).

While in college, Emerson struggled with and eventually rejected the writings of the British philosopher John Locke. We might take this passage to be a wry commentary on Locke's empiricism and his labor theory of value.
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