Quotation by Francis Bacon

The doctrine of those who have denied that certainty could be attained at all, has some agreement with my way of proceeding at the first setting out; but they end in being infinitely separated and opposed. For the holders of that doctrine assert simply that nothing can be known; I also assert that not much can be known in nature by the way which is now in use. But then they go on to destroy the authority of the senses and understanding; whereas I proceed to devise helps for the same.
Francis Bacon (1560–1626), British political figure, essayist. The Great Instauration, Aphorism 37, p. 277, Essays, Advancement of Learning, New Atlantis, and Other Pieces, ed. Richard Foster Jones, Odyssey Press, New York (1937).

An important statement of the "new science."
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