Quotation by William Gass

The fox, he felt, had never seen his past disposed of like a fall of water. He had never measured off his day in moments: another—another—another. But now, thrown down so deeply in himself, into the darkness of the well, surprised by pain and hunger, might he not revert to an earlier condition, regain capacities which formerly were useless to him, pass from animal to Henry, become human in his prison, X his days, count, wait, listen for another—another—another—another?
William Gass (b. 1924), U.S. fictionist, essayist, philosopher. "The Love and Sorrow of Henry Pimber," ch. 2, p. 42, Omensetter's Luck (1966).

"Henry Pimber," shocked by bright malice in the eyes of a fox fallen down a well, humanizes the animal to understand the power of the fox's reflected pain.
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