Quotation by Edgar Allan Poe

The history of all Magazines shows plainly that those which have attained celebrity were indebted for it to articles similar in natureto Berenice—although, I grant you, far superior in style and execution. I say similar in nature. You ask me in what does this nature consist? In the ludicrous heightened into the grotesque: the fearful coloured into the horrible: the witty exaggerated into the burlesque: the singular wrought out into the strange and mystical.
Edgar Allan Poe (1809–1849), U.S. author. The Letters of Edgar Allan Poe, letter, April 30, 1835, to Thomas W. White, ed. John Ward Ostrom (1966).

Current literary fashions fueling and rationalizing Poe's attraction to the grotesque.
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