Quotation by Mark Twain

The houses are from five to seven feet high, and all built upon one arbitrary plan—the ungraceful form of a dry-goods box. The sides are daubed with a smooth white plaster, and tastefully frescoed aloft and alow with disks of camel-dung placed there to dry. This gives the edifice the romantic appearance of having been riddled with cannon-balls, and imparts to it a very pleasing effect. When the artist has arranged his materials with an eye to just proportion—the small and the large flakes in alternate rows, and separated by carefully-considered intervals—I know of nothing more cheerful to look upon than a spirited Syrian fresco. Nothing in this world has such a charm for me as to stand and gaze for hours and hours upon the inspired works of these old masters.
Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835–1910), U.S. author. Daily Alta California (January 26, 1868). Traveling with the Innocents Abroad, ch. 42, ed. David Morley McKeithan, University of Oklahoma Press (1958).
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