Quotation by Walter Lippmann

The ordinary politician has a very low estimate of human nature. In his daily life he comes into contact chiefly with persons who want to get something or to avoid something. Beyond this circle of seekers after privileges, individuals and organized minorities, he is aware of a large unorganized, indifferent mass of citizens who ask nothing in particular and rarely complain. The politician comes after a while to think that the art of politics is to satisfy the seekers after favors and to mollify the inchoate mass with noble sentiments and patriotic phrases.
Walter Lippmann (1889–1974), U.S. journalist. repr. in The Essential Lippmann, pt. 3, sct. 6 (1982). "The New Congress," New York Herald Tribune (December 8, 1931).
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