Quotation by Albert Camus

The society of merchants can be defined as a society in which things disappear in favor of signs. When a ruling class measures its fortunes, not by the acre of land or the ingot of gold, but by the number of figures corresponding ideally to a certain number of exchange operations, it thereby condemns itself to setting a certain kind of humbug at the center of its experience and its universe. A society founded on signs is, in its essence, an artificial society in which man's carnal truth is handled as something artificial.
Albert Camus (1913–1960), French-Algerian philosopher, author. lecture, Dec. 1957, University of Uppsala, Sweden. "Create Dangerously," Resistance, Rebellion and Death (1961).
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