Quotation by Mary McCarthy

The strongest argument for the un-materialistic character of American life is the fact that we tolerate conditions that are, from a negative point of view, intolerable. What the foreigner finds most objectionable in American life is its lack of basic comfort. No nation with any sense of material well-being would endure the food we eat, the cramped apartments we live in, the noise, the traffic, the crowded subways and buses. American life, in large cities, is a perpetual assault on the senses and the nerves; it is out of asceticism, out of unworldliness, precisely, that we bear it.
Mary McCarthy (1912–1989), U.S. author, critic. repr. In On the Contrary (1961). "America the Beautiful," Commentary (New York, Sept. 1947).
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