Quotation by Aldous Huxley

The whole story of the universe is implicit in any part of it. The meditative eye can look through any single object and see, as through a window, the entire cosmos. Make the smell of roast duck in an old kitchen diaphanous and you will have a glimpse of everything, from the spiral nebulae to Mozart's music and the stigmata of St. Francis of Assisi. The artistic problem is to produce diaphanousness in spots, selecting the spots so as to reveal only the most humanly significant of distant vistas behind the near familiar object.
Aldous Huxley (1894–1963), British novelist. Philip Quarles, in Point Counter Point, ch. 19 (1939).

This passage comes from the notebook of Philip Quarles, the principal character in the narrative. As a writer committed to the novel of ideas, Quarles is in large part Huxley's self- portrait.
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