Quotation by M.F.K. Fisher

There are very few men and women, I suspect, who cooked and marketed their way through the past war without losing forever some of the nonchalant extravagance of the Twenties. They will feel, until their final days on earth, a kind of culinary caution: butter, no matter how unlimited, is a precious substance not lightly to be wasted; meats, too, and eggs, and all the far- brought spices of the world, take on a new significance, having once been so rare. And that is good, for there can be no more shameful carelessness than with the food we eat for life itself. When we exist without thought or thanksgiving we are not men, but beasts.
M.F.K. Fisher (1908–1992), U.S. culinary writer and autobiographer. How to Cook a Wolf, rev. ed., Introduction to the Revised Edition (1951).

The first edition of this book had been published in 1942, when World War II was still in progress. It seems likely that even before that war, the "nonchalant extravagance of the Twenties" was checked by the Great Depression of the 1930s.
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