Quotation by Richard Steele

There is no ordinary Part of humane Life which expresseth so much a good Mind, and a right inward Man, as his Behaviour upon Meeting with Strangers, especially such as may seem the most unsuitable Companions to him: Such a Man when he falleth in the Way with Persons of Simplicity and Innocence, however knowing he may be in the Ways of Men, will not vaunt himself thereof; but will the rather hide his Superiority to them, that he may not be painful unto them.
Richard Steele (1672–1729), British author. The Spectator, No. 132 (1711).

Spoken by a Quaker whom Mr. Spectator, the narrative persona, meets in a journey by coach.
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